A Brief History of Fracking

4 Sep

In 1974, Congress passed the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA). It is “… the main federal law that ensures the quality of Americans’ drinking water.” “The law was amended in 1986 and 1996 and requires many actions to protect drinking water and its sources: rivers, lakes, reservoirs, springs, and ground water wells.”

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In 2005, Congress passed the 2005 Energy Policy Act. There was a clause written into that act, now commonly referred to as the “Halliburton Clause”, named after Dick Cheney’s relationship to Halliburton. It is interesting that Dick Cheney held no commercial positions in his entire life as a public servant, except for his 1995-2000 tenure as Halliburton’s CEO, served just prior to becoming Vice-President. Below is the “Halliburton Clause”:

SEC. 322. HYDRAULIC FRACTURING.

Paragraph (1) of section 1421(d) of the Safe Drinking Water Act (42 U.S.C. 300h(d)) is amended to read as follows:

(1) UNDERGROUND INJECTION.—The term ‘underground injection’—

(A) means the subsurface emplacement of fluids by well injection; and

(B) excludes—

(i) the underground injection of natural gas for purposes of storage; and

(ii) the underground injection of fluids or propping agents (other than diesel fuels) pursuant to hydraulic fracturing operations related to oil, gas, or geothermal production activities.’’.

Now, as hydraulic fracturing around the world is being attributed to groundwater contamination, the industry is paying “hush money” to people who file legal cases against the industry. Drillers are trying to silence any criticism with regards to their activities.

This last week, a more public water issue came to light from a Forbes article concerning the death of some “Federally Protected Fish”.

The relationship between the “Halliburton Clause” in 2005 which gutted the SDWA and groundwater issues from hydraulic fracturing today, is not a coincidence.

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